According to recent statistics, there over eight million registered motorcycles on the roads in the United States. While drivers are more aware of motorcyclists today, than they have been in the past, accidents still occur all too often. For example, in 2015, there were 35,092 reported fatal motorcycle accidents, which represents an increase of 7.2 percent from 2014 according to the National Highway Traffic Safety Administration.

Many people wonder why these accidents are so common. One of the leading causes of motorcycle crashes is the fact that motorcycles are just more difficult to see than other vehicles on the road.

The Invisible Motorcycle

Even though motorcycles aren’t actually invisible, there are several reasons why they are more difficult to see than regular passenger vehicles. For example:

  • Motorcycles are smaller and can become obscured by other vehicles on the road, especially when there is a lot of traffic.
  • Motorcycles can easily get in another vehicle’s blind spot, leading to the driver not being able to see them.
  • Hazardous weather conditions can make it more difficult to see motorcycles, especially if they don’t have lights that are working properly.

Another interesting reason that it may be more difficult to see someone on a motorcycle is because your eyes aren’t able to see as much as you think they are. While you may consider your eyes similar to a camera, this simply isn’t the case. Your eyes have several limitations, many that make it possible to miss out on objects that are on the road.

How to Prevent Motorcycle Accidents

While it is important for a person on a motorcycle to take steps to prevent being involved in an accident, it is also necessary for other drivers on the road to take steps to avoid hitting someone on a motorcycle. Some things drivers can do to help prevent motorcycle accidents can be found here.

  • Look before making a turn. Almost 50 percent of all motorcycle accidents involving another vehicle are caused by a car trying to make a left turn while a motorcycle continues straight.
  • Constantly check blind spots. Motorcycles are smaller than cars, which means it is easier for them to get hidden in blind spots.
  • Adhere to the four-second rule. If you find yourself behind a motorcycle, increase your driving distance and keep a four second cushion.
  • Be cautious and courteous in bad weather.
  • Remain diligent and avoid distractions.

Even when you take the necessary precautions, accidents may still occur. If you are involved in an accident or injured while on your motorcycle due to the fault of another driver, it is imperative to contact a personal injury attorney for help. They can evaluate your situation and help you recover the compensation you deserve for the injuries and damages you suffered.