Most people are well aware of the dangers of distracted driving, however once you see these startling statistics closer together, you may be able to put all of the facts you have been told into perspective. These statistics only further prove the dangers of distracted driving – and how every individual operating a vehicle needs to act responsibly to reduce the numbers of accidents and accident-related fatalities.

Statistics Regarding Distracted Driving

  • There are more than 2.5 million people in the country involved in accidents each year – while the population of the country is only 318.9 million. That is a large volume of accidents for every person in this country.
  • 1.6 million people in the United States have cell phones on them – which is about 64 percent of all roadway accidents in the United States.
  • 37,000 minimum people die each year in auto accidents in the United States.
  • Each year, there are an estimated 421,000 people that are injured in accidents involving distracted drivers.
  • Each year, there are more than 330,000 accidents caused by texting drivers that lead to severe injuries. That means that more than 78 percent of distracted drivers are distracted from texting.
  • It is estimated that one out of four accidents in the U.S. are caused by texting.
  • Texting while driving is six times more likely to cause an accident than drunk driving is – which means it is almost safer for someone to drive drunk than to text while driving (though no one is recommending either).
  • It takes a person about three seconds on average to think about their text message – and this is only the bare minimum. Three seconds is also how long it takes to start your car before you drive.
  • When you read a text message while driving, it distracts you for a minimum of five seconds every time you read – which means the chances go up exponentially for an accident if you continue reading text messages and driving.
  • The average speed of a vehicle in the country is 55 miles per hour. If you take your eyes off the road for even five seconds, your vehicle will travel the entire length of a football field without you ever looking at the road ahead.
  • The time you keep your eyes off the road while texting increases by 400 percent.
  • Your chance of accident increases by 23 times when texting – even if the accident is someone else’s fault.
  • When you compare the fact that you are 2.8 times more at risk while dialing a phone number, you can tell you are at risk when texting or using a phone while driving.
  • 11 teens die every day due to texting while driving.
  • 94 percent of teens know the consequences, but 35 percent still text and drive.
  • 21 percent of teens involved in fatal accidents in the US were using a phone at the time.
  • Teens have a 400 percent higher chance of being in an accident due to texting.
  • 25 percent of teens will respond to at least one text while driving.
  • 10 percent of adults and 20 percent of teens admit to having entire text conversations while driving.
  • 82 percent of teens own a cellphone and use it regularly.
  • 52 percent of teens talk while driving, 32 percent text while driving.
  • 77 percent of adults and 55 percent of teens know they can text and drive easily.
  • Teens text while driving and 10 percent are shown to veer out of their line while doing so.
  • The University of Utah found that the reaction time for a teen using a phone is the same as that of a 70 year old not using one.
  • 48 percent of kids have been in the vehicle while the driver was texting and 1600 children are killed each year because of texting and driving.

Texting and Distractions are Serious

If you have been injured because of a texting driver, they must be held accountable for their reckless driving behavior. For your injuries and losses, turn to attorney Douglas Horn today. We can assist you with your claim and ensure that you do not have to suffer from financial distress because someone else chose to text and drive. Call 816-795-7500 to schedule a consultation or fill out an online contact form.